Introduction

Introduction

So students we have reached to the second part of law that is labour law. You were introduced to this subject law earlier in Legal and Regulatory Framework. So I hope by now you must have got accustomed to what we call Legal language, that is the language of the law that part of the legal universe which has understood miseries faced by people at work, each law in this branch of law has taken birth after millions and millions of people sacrificed their lives under the monarchy of unscrupulous businessmen. So students you are someday goanna be future managers have subordinates working below you, what I always feel is that do not be bosses of you subordinated but be a leader of your subordinate. “The difference between a boss and a leader: a boss says, ‘Go!’ – a leader says, ‘Let’s go!’”.
I was brushing through books as much as plausible and coarsely net surfing to introduced labour law for you, but none of the matters satisfied me to the fullest. When finally I grabbed a book I was currently ready that is ‘Living History’ by Hillary Rodham Clinton. I first laughed alone to myself that what a shortsighted view I personally have about law. I kept my search for introduction limited and confined only to law books. Ignoring the living history of a woman who is an epitome of thru leader, a woman who was not only the first lady of American but also played a major role in shaping domestic legislations, she traveled tirelessly around the world to champion health care, expand economic and educational opportunity and promote the needs of children and families, and she crisscrossed the globe on behalf of women’s rights, human right and democracy. Actually redefining the position of first lady in America. Brushing through the pages of this book I caught a sight of her earlier book called IT TAKES A VILLAGE.’
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Where village – a metaphor for society as a whole – shares responsibility for the culture, economy and environment in which our children grow up. The policeman walking the beat, the teacher in the classroom, the legislator passing laws and the corporate executive deciding what movies to make all have influence over America’s children’. Law to me is philosophy, it is synonyms to physychology, it is proactive and reactive to the situations in front of it. So viewing law as just legal and keeping them confined to law books is actually injustice to the subject. This subject labour law would interest those who have interest in philosophy, in acknowledging the problems of others, revolting against injustice to humans being. The village mentioned in the book for me is a metaphor to organizations where you as mangers would be working for, where there are finance manager proving guidelines on finance, director giving
directions to the organization, the H.R manger dealing with valuable human resource etc. but my contention here is finally every manger is a H.R. mangers because he works with people,deals with people, irrespective of the fact in what capacity and so he needs to be human first and manager later, so LABOUR LAW IS THE HUMAN SIDE OF LAW. The roots of labour laws can be dated back to the era known as industrial revolutioning which fundamental changes occurred in agriculture, textile and metal manufacture, transportation, economic policies and the social structure in England. This period is appropriately labeled “revolution,” for it thoroughly destroyed the old manner of doing things; yet the term is simultaneously inappropriate, for it connotes abrupt change. The changes that occurred during this period (1760-1850), in fact, occurred gradually. The year 1760 is generally accepted as the “eve” of the
Industrial Revolution. In reality, this eve began more than two centuries before this date. The late 18th century and the early l9th century brought to fruition the ideas and discoveries of those who had long passed on, such as, Galileo, Bacon, Descartes and others.
Advances in agricultural techniques and practices resulted in an increased supply of food and raw materials, changes in industrial organization and new technology resulted in  increased production, efficiency and profits, and the increase in commerce, foreign and domestic, were all conditions which promoted the  advent of the Industrial Revolution. But this revolution had significant impacts to two aspects. The human aspects and secondly labour.