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Hobby

A hobby is a regular activity that is done for pleasure, typically, during one’s leisure time. Hobbies can include: collecting themed items and objects, engaging in creative and artistic pursuits, and playing sports, along with many more examples. By continually participating in a particular hobby, one can acquire substantial skill and knowledge in that area.
Generally speaking, a person who engages in an activity solely for fun is called an amateur (from French for “lover of”) or hobbyist. This is opposed to a professional who engages in an activity for reward. An amateur may be as skilled as a professional, the principle difference being that a professional receives compensation while an amateur does not.

Development into other ventures

There have been instances where hobbies have led to significant developments beyond the personal fulfillment for those involved. Amateur astronomers have made significant contributions to the profession, and hobbyists have made discoveries such as finding an unknown celestial body or celestial event. In the area of computer programming, the invention of the Linux operating system began as a student’s hobby. A substantial amount of early scientific research came from the hobby activities of the wealthy.

Types

Collecting

The hobby of collecting includes seeking, locating, acquiring, organizing, cataloging, displaying, storing, and maintaining whatever items are of interest to the individual collector. Some collectors are generalists, accumulating merchandise, or stamps from all countries of the world. Others focus on a subtopic within their area of interest, perhaps 19th century postage stamps, milk bottle labels from Sussex, or Mongolian harnesses and tack.

Outdoor recreation

Outdoor pursuits are the group of activities which occur outdoors. These hobbies include gardening, hill walking, hiking, backpacking, canoeing, climbing, caving, fishing, wildlife viewing and engaging in watersports and snowsports.
Depending on an individual’s desired level of adrenaline, outdoors experiences are considered one type of hobby. While many enjoy an adrenaline rush or just an escape from reality, outdoor recreational activities can also be an extremely effective medium in education and team building.
As interest increases, so has the desire for commercial outdoor pursuits. Outdoor recreational supply stores have opened in large numbers and are thriving, as have outdoor pursuit journalism and magazines, both on paper and the Internet.

Performing arts

Many hobbies involve performances by the hobbyist, such as singing, acting, juggling, magic, dancing, playing a musical instrument, martial arts and other performing arts.
Creative hobbiesSome hobbies result in an end product. Examples of this would be woodworking, photography, moviemaking, jewelry making, software projects such as Photoshopping and home music or video production, making bracelets, artistic projects such as drawing, painting, etc., creating models out of cardstock or paper – called papercraft. Hobbies also include higher-end projects like building or restoring a car, or building a computer from scratch.For computer savvy do-it-yourself hobbyists, CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machining is also popular. A CNC machine can be assembled and programmed to make different parts from wood or metal.

Cooking

Cooking requires applying heat to a food which usually, though not always, chemically transforms it, thus changing its flavor, texture, appearance, and nutritional properties. It encompasses a vast range of methods and tools, and may also be used to improve the digestibility of food. It may require the selection, measurement and combining of ingredients in an ordered procedure in an effort to achieve the desired result. Constraints on success include the ambient conditions, tools and the skill of the individual cook.
The diversity of cooking worldwide reveals the myriad of nutritional, aesthetic, agricultural, agronomic, economic, cultural and religious considerations that have an impact upon it.
Cooking properly, as opposed to roasting, requires the boiling of water or oil in a receptacle, and was practiced at least since the 10th millennium BC with the introduction of pottery. There is archaeological evidence of roasted foodstuffs, both animal and vegetable, in human (Homo erectus) camp sites dating from the earliest known use of fire some 800,000 years ago.

Gardening

Residential gardening most often takes place in or about ones own residence, in a space referred to as the garden. Although a garden typically is located on the land near a residence, it may also be located on a roof, in an atrium, on a balcony, in a windowbox, or on a patio or vivarium.
Gardening also takes place in non-residential green areas, such as parks, public or semi-public gardens (botanical gardens or zoological gardens), amusement and theme parks, along transportation corridors, and around tourist attractions and hotels. In these situations, a staff of gardeners or groundskeepers maintains the gardens.