Repositioning

Repositioning

Repositioning

Brand repositioning is when a company changes a brand’s status in the marketplace. This typically includes changes to the marketing mix, such as product, place, price and promotion. Repositioning is done to keep up with consumer wants and needs.
No matter how well a product appears to be positioned, the marketer may be forced to decide on its repositioning in response to new opportunities or threats. The product may be provided with some new features or it may be associated with some new uses and offered to the existing or new markets.
For example, earlier Nestle’s Milkmaid was “Milkmaid Condensed Milk”, a convenient form of milk for use as tea or coffee creamer or whitener. The sales of Milkmaid reached a plateau in 1980s and the company repositioned the product as ideal for preparing sweets and desserts. The pack design was smartened up and changed to suit this repositioning, which led to remarkably substantial gains in sales volume.
Johnson & Johnson repositioned their baby shampoos and lotions for the adult market by changing the promotional and packaging strategy. This was in response to grow opportunities due to lifestyle changes. It is often difficult to reposition a product or brand because of consumers’ entrenched perceptions and attitudes. Some important positioning strategies have been discussed, but these are not all. Numerous other bases can be used to create a powerful brand position. A firm can differentiate its offer along the many possibilities related to product, image, service, or personnel.

Repositioning

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