Principle of Delegation

Principle & Practice of Management

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Principle of Delegation

Delegation Principles

Delegation Principles

The following delegation principles may be considered as essential for effective delegation of authority:
1. Delegate by results expected: The assignments should be defined and authority must be delegated in the light of results desired. In short, the authority must be granted to the extent which will help the accomplishment of assignments. This process involves first formulating a plan and then getting things done through the people in the organisation. [ Delegation Principles ]
2. Select appropriate subordinate for delegation: The subordinates should be selected in the light of the work to be achieved. The qualification of the individual concerned may influence the nature of the delegation of authority. This is the purpose of the managerial function of staffing, most carefully considered. [ Delegation Principles ]
3. Maintain purity of authority and responsibility: Authority should be delegated commensurate with responsibility. This is on the assumption that where subordinates are held responsible for the performance of certain duties it is fair that they should be vested with the necessary authority to carry out such duties. Although technically it would be inaccurate
to stress the questions of equality as the executive does without a certain amount of authority, there must be an adequate correlation between duty and authority delegated. [ Delegation Principles ]
4. Ensure unity of command: This is one of the common principles of organisation advocated by Henry Fayal which stresses that subordinates should have only one boss to whom he should be accountable, to avoid confusion and friction. Of course, in practice, it is not possible to follow this principle. [ Delegation Principles ]
5. Maintain adequate communication: There should be free and continuous flow of information between the superior and the subordinate with a view to furnishing the subordinate with relevant information to help him make decisions and also to interpret properly the authority delegated to him. Plans may change and decisions have to be taken in the light of the
changed conditions. [ Delegation Principles ]
6. Establish proper control: Since the manager is primarily accountable to his superiors, it is necessary to make sure that the authority delegated is properly utilised. Therefore, there must be adequate control to highlight immediately deviation from the plans resulting from the subordinate’s detailed actions. [ Delegation Principles ]
7. Reward effective delegation: Effective delegation and successful assumption of authority must be rewarded. This will provide a proper environmental climate for fuller delegation and effective assumption of authority. [ Delegation Principles ]
8. Establish a climate of confidence: The subordinate to whom authority is delegated must generally feel free from fear and have a feeling of confidence that delegation will not result in punishment but is an opportunity for his own self-development and growth. [ Delegation Principles ]
9. Establish a strong belief in the delegation: For delegation to be successful, the man who delegates must himself be convinced of the need and benefits of delegation. He must also be willing to allow his subordinates to make mistakes although he can be strict the same mistake is repeated. [ Delegation Principles ]
10. Help the subordinate: The executive who delegates must watch the subordinate not as a policeman, but as a friend or helper. Whenever assistance is required, it should be readily coming. [ Delegation Principles ]