Barcode Scanning

Barcode Scanning

Barcode Scanning

We can see the application of barcode scanning in the checkout counters of the supermarket. This code states the name of the product along with its manufacturer. Some other practical applications of barcode scanning are tracking the moving items like elements in PC assembly operations and automobiles in assembly plants.
Managing your small business’ supply chain, the network of companies, individuals and processes needed to turn raw materials from a supplier into a finished product, is becoming more complex than ever. Some supply chains span the globe, meaning there are now more chances for issues to halt the production of inventory, and thus the creation of income. That’s why more businesses are turning to barcode tracking technology to keep the supply chain simplified and efficient.Image result for Barcode Scanning in SCM diagram
For decades, barcodes were scarcely used outside of the retail point of sale systems. Now, the technology is nearly ubiquitous across a myriad of industries and points along supply chains. The information stored in both 1D (linear) and 2D (such as QR codes) barcodes helps businesses identify inventory in a timely and efficient manner, with markedly fewer errors (just one error in every 3 million characters) than seen in manual systems. As long as the businesses along the supply chain all have access to barcode creating and scanning technology, information about a product can be seamlessly integrated and tracked throughout its journey into the hands of a paying customer.
Though every company has a different supply chain, there are some general steps that are common to most businesses: suppliers, in-house purchasing, production and distribution, and the customer’s doorstep. Barcodes can be present every step of the way, passing data seamlessly into your cloud-based database, thanks to these unique benefits:

Barcodes can be created and printed almost any time

If a product or the raw materials to create a product arrive at your facilities without a barcode, one can quickly be created, printed, peeled and applied to begin tracking its movements. From there, any time a new barcode is needed, it can be printed, even on the go. Smart small businesses invest in different types of barcode printers, including:
Industrial barcode printer– Ideal for high volume warehousing applications, these printers can create high-detail or graphic barcodes en masse.
Desktop barcode printer– Perfect for printing two-inch- and four-inch-width labels right from your desk using both thermal and thermal transfer technology.
Mobile barcode printer– Best used outside the four walls of your business. For example, this kind of printer can be used if a driver needs to print a receipt with an accompanying barcode to provide proof of delivery or to notify your company that a product has reached its final destination upon scanning.